August 2/3, 2018: Canoe Journey Celebration

The Puyallup Tribe of Indians will host the Canoe Journey 2018 during July 28 – August 4. Approximately 15,000 people representing coastal tribes from all over the Pacific Northwest are expected to participate. To learn more about this year's Canoe Journey visit Power Paddle to Puyallup 2018.

The Puyallup School District will help celebrate with special events at the Karshner Museum and Center for Culture & Arts on August 2 and 3 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. All are invited to this FREE family-friendly event. 

Exhibits and Presenters:

  • - "Reviving Culture through the Canoe Journey" - A Canoe Journey Photo History by Denny Hurtado, Skokomish
  • - Mt. Tacobet to the Salish Sea: The Culture and Artifacts -  over 250 Karshner Museum artifacts on display
  • - Secretary of State's Legacy Washington - "The Survival of Washington Indians: We're Still Here"
  • - "Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Sla-hal 2015 Tournament"- a film directed by Lyn Dennis, Lummi/ Tahltan B.C.
  • - Tilly Jo Jones, Tulalip Yakima  “Weaver”  Will talk and demonstrate weaving using wool and other materials on a floor loom, show naturally dyed wools and other types of materials used in traditional weaving.
  • - Harvest Moon Howell – Will tell stories but will also talk about the process of pulling cedar bark, the steps to get the cedar to the point of weaving with it and show baskets finished and in process. 

Storytellers (see biographies below):

THURSDAY:

Gene Tagaban, Tlingit, Cherokee and Filipino

Toby Joseph, Apache, Ute

Melvin Blacketer, Nisqually and Puyallup

Harvest Moon - Quinault

FRIDAY:

Barbara Lawrence-Piecuch, Suquamish

Lois Landgrebe, Snohomish, Duwamish, Nez Perce

Harvest Moon - Quinault

Learn:  Through Film, Exhibits and speakers

Learn how to make a cattail mat, prepare cedar bark for weaving, a cattail doll, and several other projects.

Free bus transportation is available to the Canoe Journey protocols and festivities at Chief Leschi Schools both days for further immersion in the Canoe Journey. 

Openings still available

Canoe Journey Celebration Professional Development

6 clock hours are available.  

Learn the history and importance of the Canoe Journey, s
ee demonstrations and create traditional projects, listen to storytellers,  see over 250 Coast Salish Artifacts on display.

To register visit  https://staffdev.puyallup.k12.wa.us/StaffDev/ 

Class 7814 (new PD site opening on August 1)  
If there are problems registering email beltld@puyallup.k12.wa.us

AGENDA (ongoing both days)

EXHIBITS:

  • “Reviving Culture through the Canoe Journey” - A Canoe Journey Photo History by Denny Hurtado, Skokomish
  • “Mt. Tacobet to the Salish Sea: The Culture and Artifacts” -over 250 Karshner Museum artifacts
  • Secretary of State's Legacy Washington - "The Survival of Washington Indians: We're Still Here"

 KIOSKS –Multiple films, photo exhibits, content regarding Canoe Journeys; film showing traditional methods carving canoes, weaving baskets; film show current environmental & cultural efforts of tribes.

ARTISTS – exhibiting their work, demonstrating their crafts and teaching projects

THURSDAY

10-00 am – Film “Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Sla-hal 2015 Tournament

10:30 am – Storyteller*(*Note:  storytellers will perform approximately at these time as folks gather, times may vary)

11:00 am – Demonstrations – Weaving, basket weaving, drum making, pounding cedar, interactive stations for children

11:30 am - 12:30pm – Gallery Tour (From the Salish Sea to Mt. Tacobet exhibit of artifacts)

12:00 pm - Storyteller

12:30 pm -1:30 pm  Projects – cattail mat, corn husk dolls,  cedar bookmark

1:00 pm – Storyteller

1:30 pm – Demonstrations – weaving, basket weaving, drum making, pounding cedar, interactive stations for children

2:30 pm -  Storyteller and Gallery Tour (From the Salish Sea to Mt. Tacobet exhibit of artifacts)

3:00 pm -   Film “Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Sla-hal 2015 Tournament

3:30 pm - Projects and Storyteller

FRIDAY

10:00 am – Film “Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Sla-hal 2015 Tournament

10:30 am – Storyteller

11:00 am – Demonstrations – basket weaving, drum making, pounding cedar, interactive stations for children

11:30 am -12:30 pm – Gallery Tour (From the Salish Sea to Mt. Tacobet exhibit of artifacts of Coast Salish people

12:00 pm - Storyteller

12:30 pm - 1:30 pm -  Projects – cattail mat, corn husk dolls,  cedar bookmark

1:00 pm – Storyteller

1:30 pm – Demonstrations – basket weaving, drum making, pounding cedar, interactive stations for children

2:30 pm - Storyteller and Gallery Tour (From the Salish Sea to Mt. Tacobet exhibit of artifacts)

3:00 pm -  Film “Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Sla-hal 2015 Tournament

3:30 pm - Projects and Storyteller



 Denny Hurtado, former chair of the Skokomish Tribe and retired director of Indian Education for the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), was the 2014 recipient of the University of Washington Charles E. Odegaard Award.

Established in 1973, the Odegaard Award honors individuals whose leadership in the community exemplifies the former UW president’s work on behalf of diversity. It is the only University and community-selected award and is regarded as the highest achievement in diversity at the UW. In addition, Denny won the Patricia Whitefoot Leadership in Education Award.

 “I feel that the importance of documenting American Indians in the 20th and 21st centuries is of the utmost importance.  As we continue to protect our sovereignty and our culture and traditions, we are at a critical point in our history where we have turned the corner from complete genocide."

 The cultural revitalization of our Nations is tremendous. Tribal Nations, and Indigenous People throughout the world are reclaiming what rightfully belongs to them, including their traditional lands, history, culture, traditions and language. The ‘Canoe Journey’ is one of these events in the Northwest and gives much PRIDE and meaning to our people.

I began taking pictures of the journey at Quinault in 2002, and the experience of the event was so awesome that I knew I needed to document these events.”

 PHOTO EXHIBITS include Washington State Historical Museum, Evergreen State College, 25th Anniversary of the Centennial Accord Meeting, Indigenous Peoples Day Celebration, Seattle; Squaxin Island Tribal Museum, and In The Spirit, WSHM.

 
Denny Hurtado 
 

Lyn Dennis -  a member of the Lummi Nation, whose Mother was Lummi and father was Tahltan, British Columbia, B.C. Graduated from WWU in Bellingham with a Broadcast Communications Degree.  

In 2015, she produced, directed and narrated a 23 minute documentary, the “Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Sla-Hal 2015 Tournament. The film will be showing during the Karshner Center’s “A Celebration to Honor the Canoe Journey” on August 2 and 3rd, 2018.  The film premiered at the “41st Annual Film Festival” in San Francisco, was one of 24 to be selected for the International Women Director’s Film Festival in Bellingham and in May of 2018 Lyn was elected to the Cascadia International Women’s Film Festival Board of Directors.

She has worked with the Lummi Indian Business Council and helped with the fundraising and public relations for the Annual Lummi Stommish Water Festival, an event that honors the tribal veterans and cultural events including canoe races, slahal bone game tournament, and traditional dancing. Lyn researched and wrote the captions for Denny Hurtado’s photo exhibit which documents the past canoe journeys since 2002.  She has had started and owned such business endeavors as MyTribeTV, Northwest Indian News, Native Shopping Network.com in addition to serving as the Executive Director for Northwest Alliance of Gaming Tribes (now known as WIGA, Washington Indian Gaming Association), on the board for the Native American Public Telecommunications Inc.; Chief of Staff for the Lummi Business Council Chairman and assisted the Governor’s office in preparing for the Annual Centennial Accord meeting in 2003 and on top of it all owns her own gillnetter fishing boat named by her Mom, the Humdinger. 

 Lyn Dennis
 Toby Joseph - Ute and Apache from Colorado Springs, Colorado.  "I have been a storyteller for over 15 years. I have served on the Northwest Indian Storyteller Association for the last eight years and have been a filmmaker for the last 10.  I believe that storytelling is the foundation of human communication and how our people have survived.  I have enjoyed working with youth for the last 30 years around the Canoe Journey, culture and wellness programming like Whitet Bison and Healing of the Canoe curriculum."  Toby Joseph
 Lois Landgrebe – Lois Ann Langrebe was born in Seattle, her maternal grandmother was Duwamish and a descendent of Chief Seattle. On her birthfather’s side is also Nez Perce. She attended Wenatchee Valley Community College and Antioch University with a degree in Liberal Studies and Elementary Education. Lois is state certified in Lushootseed and was mentored by Vi Hilbert of the Upper Skagit and Raymond Moses of Tulalip.  She has told stories and taught Lushootseed for 23 years.  Vi once told her,  “We breathe life into our stories when telling them, the testimony of our ancestors, encourage your listeners to remember and respect these gifts.  They are the key to carrying forward.”  Lois Landgrebe
 Barbara Lawrence - Raised on the Suquamish Port Madison Indian Reservation for all of her life, Barbara has been significantly influenced by the Suquamish tribal elders and elders from other NW Coastal Tribes. They imparted to her a reverence for native stories, cultural teachings, and the importance of oral history. These tribal elders set her on a path that she continues to walk today as she pursues her passions that include storytelling, Suquamish culture and history, tribal politics, social justice, cultural resources protection, and cultural education.  Barbara Lawrence
Harvest Moon - A Quinault native, storyteller and basket weaver. "My name, Harvest Moon, was given to me by my great grandfather. Storytelling has always been a part of folk life regardless of nation race or creed in fact stories and legends have served as the history books of mankind for thousands of years." Harvest Moon has served two terms for “The Washington Commission for the Humanities”. Grants from the Seattle Arts Commission, Bainbridge Island Arts and Humanities and Heritage Arts Council for “Artist in Residency” throughout Washington Schools. Her interest in History and her vast amount of research gives her the title as a professional speaker and artist.

Harvest Moon means “A light shining forth in the midst of darkness”. She speaks from her heart and spirit, leaving people looking at a different perspective of the Northwest Coast Native Americans. Receiving the “Peace and Friendship Award”, from the Washington State Historical Society in recognition of significant contributions to the understanding of N.W. Indian Heritage.

In her presentations she describes in depth programs of the Coastal Salish Natives. Harvest Moon brings in hands on artifacts, which deliver a clearer perspective of how things were done. She will speak of the abundance of life amongst the Northwest Coast Tribes, whose rich culture has been handed down from generation to generation. Discover the unique heritage that they hold close to their hearts.

Native basket weavers, once close to extinction in most tribes, are now experiencing a rebirth of their traditions and skills. Harvest Moon delves into the history of Native American basket weaving, explaining the rituals of gathering materials and the place of skilled basket weavers within traditional society. She sees each basket as an expressive vehicle of the weaver, embodying her traditions and spiritual aspirations. Her talk is enhancing by examples of traditional baskets. Celebrating over 25 years of weaving baskets allowing her to be known as a Master Basket Weaver; teaching and displaying her work at festivals, museum gift shops and Art in Public Places and drumming and singing songs of the basket weavers of the Quinault Tribe.